You have certainly heard about Just Culture, but HOW do you respond to what you observe? This site is for you. It will help you to interprete the human behaviour with a Just Culture mindset.


Beginners: If you don't know how to select the correct level, check out the 'general purpose navigator'  first to see how it works.
Advanced users: In the below list, find the level that best matches the observed behaviour. Then select one of the follow-ups on the same row to see suggestions.

Below, directly dive into the no-frills interpreter and start interpreting human behaviour!

Level
Direct to examples
Short description of behaviour
Suggested Just Culture follow up

Exceptionally skillful handling of a safety situation. A person really excelled in probably a difficult situation.
 
Recognizing exceptional behaviour is an important element in a just culture, but it is important to be clear about WHAT you are rewarding and HOW you reward it.

...read more

By thorougly understanding how the system works, a person was able to suggest an important improvement to the operations itself or to the safety management system. 
Improving the system effectively demonstrates a high level of skill. This should be recognised and rewarded, not just for the individual but also because sets a model for other people as how they can apply their expertise and insight to help everybody improve.
...read more

People took action to help others understand and operate the system better. This could be based on a self-experienced incident or based on a known events in the organisation or elsewhere.
Becoming a teacher, sharing lessons learnt, is not only a major milestone in the development of a professional but is also a significant contribution to a safety culture. So, teachers should be recognised and rewarded.
...read more

Your person was demonstrating skills working the system as it is known. By the book, intervening where needed. He knows his business!
Working well with the system should not be trivialised. Recognising and rewarding this will establish this way of working as a desirable state. If you do not recognise or reward it, people will see working with the system as dull, boring and unattractive.

Somebody made an error. These can be "slips" or "lapses", where an action was forgotten or the action was unintentional. Or it could be a "mistake", in which the wrong procedure was applied (action was intentional, follow up was not).
First check the Routine test to see what you are dealing with.
- First time it happened (...read more)
- The same person did it before (...read more)
- Everybody does this (...read more)

A rule or procedure was not followed. Either the rule was not not known, or the rule was too ambiguous or complicated to understand properly.
First check the Routine test to see what you are dealing with:
- First time it happened (...read more)
- The same person did it before (...read more)
- Everybody does this (...read more)

Although the person knew about the rule and the rule in principle was workable, he or she decided that  this was not applicable. Either this was done to help the company or client, or this could be done because of "personal optimization".
First check the Routine test to see what you are dealing with.
- First time it happened (...read more)
- The same person did it before (...read more)
- Everybody does this (...read more)

Person knew there was a rule and person knew it was not followed, but that suited him or her just fine. Also known as "recklessness".
Situations like this need to be dealt with radically and acutely. Make sure you have checked out the Subtitution test.


...read more